Tips for Hiring a Denver Building Contractor

Posted on: January 27th, 2018 by Lori Smith
0

General Contractors in Denver, CO

Finding a good building contractor in Denver is similar to having a mechanic that you can trust. They are a priceless asset, but not always easy to find.

Checking online reviews and asking friends and family for referrals is a good start. However, many folks tend to go with their gut instinct and hope for the best.

hiring a denver building contractor

TKaucic / Pixabay

The feeling of being taken advantage of is frustrating for anyone, even when the contract laid out all of the details. It comes down to the fact that there are two sides to every story, but communication is the key to creating a trusted relationship.

Once you have done your research, talked with a company rep on the phone, and narrowed it down to at least three contractors, set up an appointment with them in person to get cost estimates and find out more about their company’s background:

The best way to determine your comfort level is with a thorough an interview. In addition to whether they are able to do the job, you need to obtain the following information:

-Their qualifications: How long they have been in business, how the company operates (e.g. using their own staff or subcontractors), and their experience with similar jobs.
-Their references: Obtain contact information for at least three of the contractor’s past customers with projects of similar complexity.
-Their suggestions: Ask what they think of your project, what ideas they can offer to improve it or get more value for the money.
-Their estimate: Ask for an initial “ballpark” estimate of costs for your project and when it could be started and finished.

Interviewing a Contractor

Are They Licensed & Insured

You need to always make sure that the contractor is licensed, bonded, and insured. This ensures that the company is dependable and follows the laws. Also, if something goes wrong, the client will have a way to collect damages.

Worst case scenario, if the contractor is shady and the project goes south, you may not be able to get a hold of the contractor, which leaves you no recourse but to pursue legal action. The problem with this is you will be spending a lot of money to recover your costs and fix whatever was done incorrectly.

This is an excellent video for anyone looking to hire a building contractor:

Housing Market in Denver, CO

It is projected that Colorado’s construction industry will plateau off in 2018 as it faces labor shortages and growing costs. Employment, in general, is showing signs of stalling, indicating that the state’s economy has finally hit a bump in the road.

In 2016, 57,300 jobs were created in Colorado and only one thousand less in 2017, which equates to a 2.2% growth. However, in 2018 it is expected to slow down to 1.8% growth, which means that the construction sector will also see a drop-off.

There are thousands of general contractors in the Front Range area, so here are some tips for hiring a Denver building contractor:

Be sure to talk to and visit at least three previous clients and utilize the Better Business Bureau. You should also insist on proof that the contractor is insured and bonded. Check with the insurance company that the contractor’s policy is current.

Researching Denver Contractors

mrminibike / Pixabay

  • Verify that your contractor has a Denver license, using our contractor license search.
  • Insist that the contractor acquire all necessary building permits.
  • Avoid contractors who won’t give a receipt for payments.
  • Check that addresses and phone numbers are legitimate on business cards.
  • Ask for a backup plan if the contractor becomes ill or unavailable for any reason.

Contractor Licenses – Denver Community Planning and Development

A good tip is to beware of any contractor that advises the homeowner to secure the permit in their own name.  The reason is that permit holder is legally responsible for completing the job to code standards, so any problems would be the responsibility of the homeowner instead of the contractor.

 

 

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: