Posts Tagged ‘hail resistant roofing materials’

Shingles That Stand Up Against Hail

Posted on: July 8th, 2017 by Lori Smith
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Depending on where you live, hail can be a big problem when it comes to protecting your property. A bad hail storm can wipe out a whole neighborhood, damaging windows, plants, siding, and, of course, the roof.

Along the Front Range of Colorado, we have plenty of weather extremes. Even though you hear a lot about the crazy weather in Texas, our state came in right behind the Lone Star State for highest number of hail damage claims for 2016, according to the Denver Post:

Colorado ranks second to Texas for number of hail-damage claims – The Denver PostShingles that stand up to hail

Colorado ranks second only to Texas for the number of insurance claims filed due to hail strikes on homes, property and cars the past three years, according to the National Insurance Crime Bureau.

Hail-related insurance claims in Colorado numbered 182,591 between 2013 and 2015, accounting for 9 percent of the U.S. total. That’s high for a state with only 1.7 percent of the country’s population.

Texas, which could fit three Colorados within its borders, had 394,572 hail-related claims, or 19 percent of the U.S. total, making it the top state.

Read the original post here:  Colorado ranks second to Texas for number of hail-damage claims

With this in mind, it would be wise to find the best shingles that stand up against hail. There are a number of options that will fit the bill, but it does depend on how much you want to spend.

Shingles made of clay and concrete are higher in cost, partially due to the necessary infrastructure to support their weight, but are extremely durable. Dimensional shingles, also known as architectural or laminated shingles, are becoming more popular because of their wind, fire, and hail resistance, but again they cost 20 – 40% more than 3-tab asphalt shingles.

Metal is another good option for hail resistant roofing, but it really comes down to initial cost vs durability. Insurance companies, such as the one in the next video, report that impact resistant roofing materials, sometimes referred to as Class 4 materials, will not only last longer but they can save you money with potential insurance premium discounts:

So let’s get down to the bottom line, which is the cost based on your insurance policy.  Will your insurance company pay for the damages? There are some factors that will influence the answer.

Events such as disastrous “acts of God” like tornadoes or hurricanes are usually covered along with unpreventable issues like vandalism and fires. However, hail and wind can be a little different, as there are outlying components that will decide the percentage of damage that is covered.

One big factor is the age of your roof. If your roof is older than 10 years, then you need to have regular inspections to check for problems, and more than likely you may only be reimbursed for the depreciated value of the damaged roof.

The following post discusses how depreciation works:

Does My Insurance Policy Cover Roof Damage? | Homesite InsuranceHome Insurance

Some policies take the age of your roof into account at the time it is damaged. For example, if your roof is under 10 years old, you may be covered for the full cost of repairing or replacing the damaged section of your roof at the time of the claim. If your roof is over 10 years old, you may only be reimbursed for the depreciated value of the damaged roof. The depreciated value takes the aging and wearing of your roof into account, meaning its value has decreased prior to any damage occurring. Depending on where you live, some policies will only offer roof damage coverage up to the depreciated value, regardless of the age of your roof. Other policies will cover the full cost of repairing or replacing the damaged section of your roof at the time of the claim, regardless of the age of your roof.

See more here:  Does My Insurance Policy Cover Roof Damage? | Homesite Insurance

No matter what, your insurance provider will send an inspector to your property to verify your claim and give you an estimate of the damages. You’d be wise to take some before and after pictures of your roof as proof.